No Cash, No Heart. Transplant Centers Need to Know You Can Pay.


Medicare also covers kidney transplants for patients with end-stage renal disease. But, there’s a catch. While the cost of a kidney transplant is covered for people younger than 65, the program halts payment for anti-rejection drugs after 36 months. That leaves many patients facing sudden bills, said Tonya Saffer, vice president of health policy for the National Kidney Foundation.

Legislation that would extend Medicare coverage for those drugs has been stalled for years.

For Alex Reed, 28, of Pittsburgh, who received a kidney transplant on Nov. 9, 2015, coverage for the dozen medications he takes ended Nov. 30. His mother, Bobbie Reed, 62, said she has been scrambling for a solution.

“We can’t pick up those costs,” said Ms. Reed, whose family runs an independent insurance firm. “It would be at least $3,000 or $4,000 a month.”

Prices for the drugs, which include powerful medications that prevent the body from rejecting the organs, have been falling in recent years as more generic versions have come to market, Ms. Saffer said.

But “the cost can still be hard on the budget,” she added.

It’s been a struggle for decades to get transplants and associated expenses covered by insurance, said Dr. Maryl Johnson, a heart failure and transplant cardiologist at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

“It’s unusual that there’s 100 percent coverage for everything,” said Dr. Johnson, a leader in the field for 30 years.

GoFundMe efforts have become a popular way for sick people to raise money. About a third of the campaigns on the site target medical needs, the company said.



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